UVA Pre-Health Advising Blog

News and Opportunities for Students Preparing for Health Professional Programs

Thursday, August 3, 2017
Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine invites you to the Osteopathic Medicine Awareness Conference and Open House
Saturday, September 9th
9:00 AM - 1:30 PM
Harrogate, Tennessee
  • Learn about osteopathic medicine
  • Speak with current faculty, staff, and students
  • Observe OMM demonstrations
  • Tour state-of-the-art facilities
  • Get tips on applying to medical school 

Register by Friday, August 25th

Contact:
Whitney Porter, Admissions Recruiter
423.869.6091
whitney.porter@LMUnet.edu

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Pre-Medical Hospice Volunteer Program connects undergraduate students with patients receiving palliative care through Hospice (an organization that helps patients achieve the highest quality of care at the end of their lives). With Hospice volunteer training, regular patient visitation, and on-going support, this program offers a unique opportunity to meet directly with patients and cultivate your identity as a caregiver.

The Pre-Medical Hospice Volunteer Program includes the following components:

  • 16 hours of training as a Hospice volunteer
  • Weekly or bi-weekly patient visits
  • A community of support shaped by Resource and Reflection meetings and online resources
  • A year-end reflection essay
  • A Certificate of Completion for inclusion in medical school applications 

This unique multi-disciplinary program is a collaborative effort between Ardmore Presbyterian Church and Hospice and is funded by the Athena Institute for Women's Wellness. Due to the demanding nature of this experience, the emotional complexity of Hospice, and spiritual issues raised by death - your learning cohort will be moderated by a Chaplain.
Note: This program is open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year students regardless of religious belief, race, creed, or national origin.

If you are interested, please review the additional information and application below.
Application deadline: August 31st

Questions? Contact Volunteer Coordinator, Tina Huey-Commers at tina.hughey-commers@hopeva.org with Hospice of the Piedmont.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

All current dental school applicants are invited to join ADEA AADSAS Live -- a free, online event for current applicants to chat live directly with customer service representatives regarding the application.

In addition to ADEA AADSAS customer service staff, dedicated experts will be available during the event to offer tips and answer questions about specific topics, including:

  • Fee Assistance Program (FAP): 2:00-3:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Personal Statement: 3:00-4:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Letters of Evaluation: 4:00-5:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Financing a Dental Education: 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Time

Those applicants who registered for or attended the ADEA GoDental Virtual Fairs on My 21st or June 15th do not need to register again, and will automatically receive information about logging in on August 7, 2017.

Applicants who did not participate in the 2017 ADEA GoDental Virtual Fairs will need to register to access the event.

Friday, July 21, 2017

The Southeastern Medical Scientist Symposium (SEMSS) is an annual meeting of MD-PhD students, MD students, and undergraduates from the southeastern United States. The goal of the symposium is to bring together faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students to foster discussion about physician scientist career paths and research and encourage a collaborative and interdisciplinary educational environment within the region.

SEMSS 2017
Atlanta, GA
November 18-19th
Hosted by students in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at Emory University
Highlight: UVA '15 Alum, Carey Stewart Jansen, current Emory MSTP student
Interested?
Apply for an Undergraduate Student Travel Award!
20 awards will be given to undergraduate students interested in exploring careers as physician-scientists. 
Deadline: September 15, 2017
Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Virginia Wellness Initiative is organizing a free health screening at the African American Cultural Arts Festival on Saturday, July 29th at Washington Park. Undergraduate volunteers are needed to staff some of the health screening stations.

If you are interested in attending, please contact Catherine Jansch, UVA Medical Student, at cj3rd@virginia.edu. She will provide you with further information and a link to sign up.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

The Madison House Medical Services program provides opportunities for UVA students to volunteer at the UVA Health System, Martha Jefferson Hospital, and the Charlottesville Free Clinics. The mission of Medical Services is to serve the community and to provide meaningful experiences to all of our volunteers. Volunteers assist hospital staff, patients, and their families in a wide variety of roles throughout our partner sites. We try to match volunteers with positions that match their career interests and to provide opportunities for volunteers to gain leadership experience.

Medical Services volunteers make a year-long commitment to serve a 3-hour shift each week of the academic year.

Please note, signups for Medical Services occur only during the Fall semester and students commit to a full year of service. If you are interested in volunteering in a healthcare setting this academic year, you should seek opportunities through a different program.

Fall 2017 Information Sessions
Prospective volunteers must attend one of four mandatory information sessions, where they will learn about the program and we will explain how to apply to receive a sign-up time. Applicants will then have an opportunity to attend an optional Program Director (PD) Meet & Greet, in order to learn more about specific units of their interest. Prospective volunteers do not have to complete any applications prior to the information sessions.

  • Monday 8/28, 5-6pm, in Newcomb Theater
  • Tuesday 8/29, 6-7pm, in Newcomb Ballroom
  • Wednesday 8/30, 5-6pm, in Newcomb Ballroom
  • Thursday 8/31, 5-6pm, in Newcomb Ballroom (PD Meet & Greet will be held at the Kaleidoscope Room from 6-7pm following this session)

Sign-ups will take place on Sunday, September 3, 2017 from 9 am to 5pm on Sign-Up Sunday.

Due to the high level of interest in this program, each applicant will be randomly assigned to an appointment time after attending an info session AND completing the application. In order to sign up for a shift, you must attend Sign-Up Sunday at your designated time, no exceptions.

Please see the Madison House website for confirmation of dates, times, and locations above as well as further information. 

Friday, July 14, 2017
 Friday, July 28th 
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 
Carilion Roanoke Community Hospital 
101 Elm Ave SE, Roanoke, VA 
Jefferson College of Health Sciences at Carilion Clinic invites those interested in learning more about their Master of Science Degree in Physician Assistant to attend this information session.  
Find more information
Tuesday, July 11, 2017

As a growing medical scribe company, Scribekick has a variety of full and part-time medical scribe jobs with doctors across a wide range of specialties in locations throughout the mid-Atlantic and Southeast.

Current Openings:
Locations with current openings change frequently, so please check the website (current medical scribe job listings) for current information. Current openings include:
  • Cardiology - Richmond, VA; New York, NY
  • Family Practice - Washington DC; Richmond, VA; Greensboro, NC; Charleston, SC
  • OB/GYN - Richmond, VA
  • Orthopaedics - Richmond, VA; Hampton Roads, VA; Indianapolis, IN
  • Physical Medicine - Roanoke, VA
What Is Scribing?
As a medical scribe, you’ll chart each patient’s electronic medical record, allowing doctors to focus their attention strictly on the patient. This streamlines operations at the office and gives doctors more time to treat patients.
Meanwhile, the scribe gains invaluable field experience and a much deeper, more practical understanding of the doctor’s area of expertise.
Possible Specialties:
Scribekick works with doctors across the medical spectrum. Here are a few areas we currently serve:
  • Primary Care: Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Pediatrics
  • Medical Specialties: Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Pulmonary, Radiation Oncology, PM&R/pain
  • Surgical/procedural specialties: Orthopedic, General, Breast, Urology, Dermatology
Medical Scribe Requirements
  • Full-time commitment: We prefer scribes who can commit to working full time with a particular doctor for one year. This lets you form a close working relationship and be of the greatest help to the practice. However, part-time opportunities are also available.
  • Punctual and responsible: The practice is going to rely on you for smooth operation, so you must have the utmost commitment to daily attendance.
  • Excellent communicator: Listening is key to being a successful scribe. You’ll also need to be able to quickly and efficiently communicate with your doctor, which entails a complete command of written and verbal English.
  • Superior multi-tasking and computer skills: These positions require almost constant work on a tablet or computer; the more accurate and speedy your typing and the better you’re able to juggle multiple tasks, the greater of an asset you’ll be to your doctor.
  • Keen attention to detail: Charting in an EMR is an exacting practice. You’ll need to be alert at all times and adept at catching even the most trivial of mistakes.
  • Significant interest in the field: You’re going to be immersed in the specialty of the practice. If you’re brimming with interest in the field and are thinking of pursuing it in future studies, this will benefit you as well as the doctor.
How Do I Benefit?
Scribing is hard work, but it’s also enormously beneficial as you pursue a career somewhere in the medical arena.
  • Unbeatable Experience: As you know, when it comes to deciding upon a future field of study, there’s no substitute for experience. During your work, you’ll essentially be shadowing one particular doctor day in, day out. This is an unparalleled opportunity for you to get a sense for what it’s really like providing care in your field. Plus, you’ll have a huge leg up on students who come into medical school without such practical experience.
  • In-Depth Training: Before you start, you’ll be put through an intense, fully-compensated training regimen to get you up to speed with scribing as well as the particular specialty of your practice.
Learn More and Apply
See what’s available now and submit an application by visiting:
About the Company
Bradley Barr founded Scribekick after seeing his father struggle with ever-­increasing EMR documentation requirements. It was an all too common story of a doctor who cared about helping patients and providing quality care but was one of the 49% of physicians who now reports as being “burned out” ­after spending too many late nights in front of the computer.
Having a scribe ­allowed him to free up valuable time to spend with his family members and changed his life. What started with one strong advocate turned into many as we continued to hear “it’s the most impactful change since I started practicing medicine.”
It is our way to help those that take care of us every day.
Contact:
Ann Coleman Brogan
Head of Recruiting & HR

Ann.Coleman.Brogan@scribekick.com

Thursday, July 6, 2017

 

Thursday, July 27th:  The American Physician Scientists Association (APSA) will hold an interactive Q&A session on the 2017-2018 MSTP and MD-PhD application process. 

F
eatured experts are Dr. Robin Lorenz from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Dr. Skip Brass from the University of Pennsylvania, and Dr. Kerry O'Banion from the University of Rochester
The session will be hosted via GoToMeeting (www.gotomeeting.com) on Thursday, July 27th at 6pm EST. GoToMeeting may be accessed via phone or computer and a meeting specific call-in number will be made available before the session.
There will be a follow-up discussion forum on Medstro (https://medstro.com/groups/american-physician-scientists-association) the following week for further discussion and questions.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Health Sciences Open House
Wednesday, July 19, 2017  1pm-3pm
 
Biomedical Sciences (MS)
Physician Assistant Studies (MS)
Forensic Medicine (MS, Pathway)
Aging and Long Term Care Administration (MS)
Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Open House
Tuesday, July 25, 2017  4pm-8pm
                         Osteopathic Medicine (DO)

      Online registration can be found at pcom.edu.
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Evans Hall
4170 City Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19131
office 215-871-6700 | fax 215-871-6719

Tuesday, June 27, 2017
The HHS/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is interested in recruiting students like you for internship opportunities as part of their Public Health Student Internship Program (PHSIP)! 
HRSA’s mission is to “improve health care access and quality, promote best practices, and eliminate health disparities.  HRSA programs serve everyone from infants to the elderly, to assure that people in the U.S. have access to a broad range of essential personal and public health services. With more than 3,000 grantees, HRSA supports hands-on health care, clinician training, research and more.”  HRSA is located in Rockville, MD less than a mile away from Twinbrook Metro station (Red Line).  Click here to learn more about HRSA.  


Internship Details:

The PHSIP is an unpaid internship opportunity that serves to provide career exploration in the federal government, shadowing, valuable experience, and academic credit-as approved by the academic institution to students across a variety of disciplines.  Internship terms are flexible and can vary depending on the needs of the academic institution and the intern.  The PHSIP operates on a rolling and continuous basis, and internships can start/end throughout the year.  There is no application deadline.  Each intern will be assigned to a preceptor for supervision and mentoring purposes.  Interns must be currently enrolled students.  Please visit this site for more information about HRSA’s Public Health Student Internship Program (PHSIP)

Application Instructions:

If interested in participating in the Public Health Intern Program at HRSA, contact the HRSA Strategic Recruitment office at PHSIP@hrsa.gov.  Attach the following items to your message: application form (PDF - 490 KB), resume, and unofficial transcript. Documents in .pdf format are preferred.
Tuesday, June 20, 2017

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health will be hosting a This Is Public Health Graduate School Fair on July 19, in Washington, DC. The fair will run from 5:30- 7:30 p.m. at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Students are able to meet with representatives from ASPPH, This Is Public Health, SOPHAS, and over 30 schools and programs of public health.

This will be one of many fairs throughout the summer and fall including virtual fairs. SOPHAS will be hosting a virtual fair on July 11.



Registration and attendance, to all events, is FREE for students! Students can use the following links to register:

 

        Tuesday, June 20, 2017
        Charlottesville Eye Associates is a busy Ophthalmology practice with immediate openings for entry level medical technicians. These are entry level opportunities with on-the-job training provided. They are seeking responsible and motivated individuals who desire to work in the healthcare field. Good communication and computer skills required. 
        Send resume to the the Charlottesville Eye Associates, Office Manager, Dawn Wright at imanager97@gmail.com 

        Friday, June 16, 2017
        This summer, join other Pre-Health Hoos in reading
        "Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown,
        and her family can’t afford health insurance."

        Winner of the National Academies Communication Award, 2011
        for best creative work that helps the public understanding of topics in
        science, engineering, or medicine.

        Fall 2017 Pre-Health Hoo Common Reading discussion groups
        Monday, 10/9, 12 - 1:30 PM, Newcomb 481
            Thursday, 11/16, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, Newcomb 177

        Friday, June 16, 2017
         Excited about the slower pace and freedom of the summer?
        You undoubtedly read pages and pages of assigned readings for classes all year long -
        now it is time to read something fun, just for you! 
        If you are seeking book recommendations for aspiring healthcare professionals, check out our list below. 
        1.   The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks -- Rebecca Skloot

        2. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Happens in the End -- Atul Gawande, MD

        3. An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take it Back -- Elizabeth Rosenthal, MD

        4. Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction -- Maria Szalavitz

        5. Cutting for Stone -- Abraham Verghese, M.D.

        6. The House of God -- Samuel Shem

        7. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales -- Olivers Sacks, MD

        8. Still Alice -- Lisa Genova 

        9. When Breath Becomes Air -- Paul Kalanithi, M.D .

        10. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down -- Anne Fadiman 

        11. Black Man in a White Coat -- Damon Tweedy, M.D. 
        12. Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA -- Brenda Maddox
        Tell us what you're reading on social media by using #PreHealtHoosRead!
        Thursday, May 4, 2017

        What research have you been involved with at UVA?

        Since my first year, I have been a research assistant in the Clore Emotions Lab with the UVA Psychology Department. Initially, I volunteered in the lab for a few months, to gauge whether or not I had a true interest in research. I soon learned to love everything about it – from waiting on the IRB’s approval, to putting in the hours of labor to conduct research procedures, and finally to performing the data analysis. Through this opportunity I discovered more about my academic interests and learned to effectively work with others towards a common purpose.
        I am now also one of the research assistants for the Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes Study at the University of Virginia Medical Center. The ultimate goal of this project is to improve pregnancy outcomes for all women by creating a repository of maternal tissue samples linked to maternal and neonatal demographic and clinical information. In this lab, I process biological samples, handle electronic medical records, receive direct patient interaction, and obtain unique clinical experience in a hospital setting. It is a sweet deal, especially since I am considering Obstetrics & Gynecology!
        How has joining a research team prepared you for a career in healthcare?
        My involvement in research has greatly improved my communication skills. I have learned how to speak effectively to a broad population of patients. I also gained time management skills, since becoming invested in a research project is similar to adding another class to your schedule. My private investigator has also taught me many aspects of health care that cannot be learned from a textbook.
        Why do you recommend this opportunity for other UVA undergraduates?
        I encourage other undergrads to explore research opportunities, because in addition to further developing your communication, time management, and analytical skills, the project you undertake will have a large impact on the scientific community. While obtaining important interpersonal skills, you also have the opportunity to make a difference and improve our understanding of various processes related to the field of study. In addition, some majors at UVA (such as biology and psychology) allow you to conduct research for credit. I highly recommend doing so because research is a fun and interesting way to obtain credits towards your major.
        How does one become involved in research?
        The first step is to determine which area of research you would enjoy pursuing. Do your own research. Visit the department’s homepage, where you will find links to all faculty members, and read about the research being conducted at UVA. Once you have narrowed down your interest, create a generic email template containing an introduction of yourself, your interests, and your desire to meet with the faculty advisor to learn more about the project. You will have to send this email to several professors, and it may take time to finally receive a response. In my case, it took me a month before I received a response from Professor Clore, but don’t give up hope! Utilize the resources available through the Undergraduate Research Network including UNLEASH.
        Do you plan on incorporating research in your future endeavors?
        Yes, during my bridge year I hope to continue conducting clinical research to deepen my experiences and understandings of the medical field and health care. I am currently perusing possible research fellowship options abroad. The great thing about research is that your options are limitless because there is still much the scientific community does not understand. There are many unexplored frontiers.
        Hello! My name is Lindsey Vu and I am one of the members-at-large on the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board. I am currently a third-year undergraduate pursuing a double major in Biology and Psychology on the pre-med track. I was inspired to pursue a medical career by the doctors who treated my ill grandfather when I was young. I saw how the physicians were not only able to treat his pain, but also to ameliorate our worries and concerns. This compassionate, humanistic side of medicine truly enticed me.
        On Grounds, I have been involved in several service organizations such as Medical Services, Pet Pals, and Relay for Life. I have also held leadership positions with the Vietnamese Student Association and The BIG Event. However, being involved in research is what I have enjoyed the most throughout my time at UVA.
        Thursday, May 4, 2017

        Cape Town South Africa Summer Field School

         
        Q: What is UVA in Cape Town South Africa Summer Field School?  
        A: It’s a five-week summer program for students interested in public health and medicine. The field school fully immerses participants in a public health project from inception to completion. You will start with a preparatory project, which helps you understand the community and how to effectively interact with community members. As a music major, my preparatory project was to explore the role of music in our township! My teammates and I spent hours going door-to-door asking residents what types of music they listen to!

        After presenting the preparatory project, you will be assigned your main project. There are students from many different academic backgrounds, so projects change every year based on the background of participants and needs of the community. Some projects are more pre-health focused and some are heavier on anthropology. I was part of a team of six undergraduate students working on social behavioral effects of chronic illnesses in the community. Our project required a public health and anthropological approach. I have engaged in public health projects in the past, but what made this program unique was the utilization of anthropology to help produce results for some core public health issues.

        Q: How did you learn about this program?
        A: During my Critical Public Health PHS2559.

        Q: What made you decide to engage in this clinical opportunity?
        A: I took a J-term course in critical public health. I was quite nervous both because it was my first public health course and a J-term course. The coursework was quite heavy, but within two weeks, I found myself fully engaged in the topic. Towards the end of the term, our instructor introduced the program, and I decided to take what I had learned to the next level.

        Q: What did your experience in this position consist of? Can you describe a typical day?
        A: A typical day would start with Xhosa lessons. Xhosa is the local language in our township, so we spend an hour everyday sharpening our language skills before going out to the community. Every project was led by a public health professional as project advisor and a local resident as translator. After mapping out the area and identifying our interviewees, we would go conduct our interview which would typically take about an hour. During each interview, we had two teammates ask questions and one take notes. After each interview, we would reconvene to reflect and discuss the quality of the interview. After an hour break around noon for lunch, we continued the interview and discussion cycle until 5pm.

        Q: What distinguished this opportunity from other options you might have pursued?
        A: I have always enjoyed public health, fieldwork, and in general community work, but I was always doubtful if I could do well abroad. This program helped me realized how much I enjoy fieldwork and community work. In the past, I feared language barrier and cultural differences might get in the way, but we are all part of human race and with some genuine mindfulness we can connect each other regardless of the language we speak or our cultural background. As result, I’m applying for Peace Corp after graduation.

        Q: Why do you recommend this opportunity for other UVA grads?
        A: The program has an extensive focus on health disparity and equity; this topic is also very significant in many communities here in the U.S. Therefore, for those who are planning to pursue a degree in health or work in underrepresented communities, this program is an invaluable experience. For those who are planning to pursue medicine, this program would help them to establish and maintain a stronger and more meaningful connection with their patients in the future.

        Q: How did this experience help to prepare you for your next step?
        A: First and foremost, this program helped me to expand my view towards health work in general. It enabled me to identify multi-layer issues around health disparity and choose an effective method of analysis for further studies. In a broader sense, this program made me a better observer, a better listener, and a better teammate, all of which are essential for my future fieldworks. It also helped me develop a greater sense of respect and appreciation towards different perspectives through hours and hours of fieldwork.

        Q: Is there anything else you would like to share?
        A: Life starts at the end of your comfort zone, so never fear challenge but be prepared!  

        Pouya Pairo is a 4th year transfer student in the College majoring in Music. He is the Vice President of Programs for Daniel Hale Williams and has served on the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board for two years. He is interested in public health and the osteopathic approach to medicine.
        Thursday, May 4, 2017

        Are you looking to fill a gap year with direct, hands-on medical experience? Anne Arundel
        Dermatology, P.A. offers a Post-Baccalaureate Medical program to prepare you for your career
        as a future clinician. If you are interested in a career in medicine, we invite you to explore our
        program.

        Anne Arundel Dermatology, P.A., has been serving patients in Anne Arundel County Maryland
        and surrounding areas for over 40 years. Our longevity and growth in the area speaks volumes
        for our outstanding corporate culture and vision as well as an exceptional professional
        environment. We currently employ 55 of the area’s best clinicians, with 21+ clinical offices also
        offering Clinical Cosmetic/Medical Aesthetics, a Mohs surgery center and a Dermatopathology
        Lab. We have state of the art, fully integrated EMR and we employ the area’s best, top quality
        administrative and clinical support staff. We offer flexible scheduling, great corporate culture,
        competitive compensation and health benefits.

        Requirements
        Anne Arundel Dermatology offers a paid post-baccalaureate program for graduates seeking
        additional experience prior to entering medical school and physician assistant programs. Work
        alongside the area’s leading Mohs Micrographic Surgeons to gain experience in direct patient
        care. Responsibilities include performing basic medical assistant techniques such as obtaining
        vitals, completing patient intake, assisting with biopsies, excisions and skin cancer surgery. Must
        be a team player and like a busy work environment. Flexible schedule of at least 4 days per
        week availability required.

        The program is structured similar to a paid internship with opportunities for community outreach
        to include Miles for Melanoma 5k, a Community Free Clinic, and Clinical Research
        Opportunities.

        Job Details

        • No experience necessary, although Scribe experience a plus. Willing to train the right
        • candidate!
        • Competitive hourly rate
        • Some travel required with compensation or transportation provided.
        • 1-2 year commitment preferred

        For more information, please submit your CV to Jeannie Sheehan, Manager of Physician
        Recruitment at JSheehan@aadermatology.com.

        Monday, May 1, 2017

        Pre Health Hoos who successfully gained admission to a health professional program during the 2016-17 application cycle offer reflections and tips for future applicants:


        Preparation for the Health Professions
        “Shadow different professionals in the health profession you are interested in!”
        -Danielle Hester, UVA ‘17, Optometry
        “Stay committed, don't get discouraged at initial setbacks, and reach out to upperclassmen and your physician mentors for advice.”
        -Yash Maniar, UVA ’17, Medicine
        “Take advantage of all the resources UVA has to offer, especially the pre-health advising office. Persistence and planning ahead of time will lead you to success in whatever field you choose!”
        -Rachel Zaragoza, UVA ’15, Medicine
        “It's a marathon, so get discouraged at the first obstacle! I had a C and C+ in hard science classes and still got in at multiple medical (MD and DO) schools. Also, I cannot understate the importance of playing the long game. Make a plan ASAP and follow through! Where are you going to shadow? What year will you take the MCAT? Gap year? Are my grades okay? Volunteering? Essays?  It sounds like a lot but once you beat some of it into shape (with a plan!) it becomes much more manageable bite sized steps.”
        -Jack Hawkins, UVA ’17, Medicine
        “Start getting involved with clinical activities early and build a mentorship team.”
        -Kiera Sibbald, UVA ’14, Medicine

        "Don't feel constrained to a single path. The medical school application is a package, and any unique experiences will help you along the way."
        -Will Clark, UVA '16, Medicine

        “Follow your dreams at UVA, even if it doesn't include a science major. Stay well rounded in the process and learn yourself in and out before applying!”
        -Briana Brazile, UVA ’14, Dentistry
        Application Process
        “While it is important to get your application in as early as possible, do not be afraid to take some extra time to make your application/personal statement as polished as possible. Also, do not take any entrance exam (DAT, MCAT, OAT, etc.) unless you feel ready (usually indicated by a desire to get the test over with). It is okay to postpone your test and make use of the extra time to study.”
        -Quang Do, UVA ’17, Dentistry
        “Good GPA and test scores are important but having your individuality, enthusiasm and dedication to the field expressed through great recommendations and essays is what will make you shine among other applicants.”
        -Adrienne Lewis, UVA ’17, Physical Therapy
        “Do your research on schools ahead of time! Think about what area you'd be comfortable living in for the next few years of your life. Think about why you're applying to each specific school. That way, you will have points to bring up in an interview and also, so that you don't waste tons of money on applications that could go towards your education instead!”
        -Ani Bournazian, UVA ’17, Occupational Therapy
        “Medical school admissions committees want to learn more about who YOU are, not who you think they want you to be. I was surprised to find that many of the things talked about most in my interviews were what I saw to be relatively minor, such as my love for hiking or my involvement in musical theater. However, these are the things that best show who I am as a person and allow for a more personal connection. Celebrate what you love to do and what makes you unique; you'll be surprised how much these experiences will be helpful in building rapport and making you memorable. Your personal interests and passions will stick in the mind of an interviewer far better than another award or research project that they can already find in your application.”
        -Jeremy Jones, UVA ’17, Medicine
        “Be yourself and follow your heart during your applications. Show them how you have become academically, intellectually, and socially competent through your experiences. Also, start early and stay on top of everything - it will be a rough process!”
        -Kevin Kim, UVA ’15, Medicine
        “Don't worry about any one rejection - there are plenty of other schools!”

        -Caroline Kerr, UVA ’17, MD/PhD

        Monday, May 1, 2017

         Pre-Health Advising would like to congratulate UVA applicants who gained admission to their health professional program of choice during the 2016-17 application cycle!

        This is not a complete list of UVA applicants who were admitted. If you are a UVA grad who would like to be recognized here for successful admission to a health professional program in the
        '16-17 application cycle, please complete this form!

        Abigayle Ceriani: Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘14
        Adrienne Lewis: Physical Therapy, Curry School of Education ‘17
        Amanda Dickerson: Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Andrew Coder: Pharmacy, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Ani Bournazian: Occupational Therapy, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Briana Brazile: Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘14
        Caroline Kerr: MD/PhD, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Chris Cai: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘16
        Coco Kubicki: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Danielle Hester: Optometry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Deanna Noble: Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Dylan Campbell: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Elise Huppert: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Erin Smith: Physical Therapy, Curry School of Education ‘17
        Jack Hawkins: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Jeremy Jones: Medicine, Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Joanna Gurman: Occupational Therapy, Curry School of Education ‘17
        Karina Payerhin: Veterinary Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘16
        Kevin Kim: Medicine, School of Engineering and Applied Science ‘15
        Lindsay Riordan: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Louisa Howard: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘14
        Mary Spitler: Advanced Practice Nursing, Curry School of Education ‘17
        Prash Fenn: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Quang Do: Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Rachel Zaragoza: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘15
        Rebecca Kelly: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Reza Moghaddasnia: Physician Assistant, College of Arts and Sciences
        Shaina Haque: Public Health, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Tim Chastanet: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Will Clark: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences '16
        Yash Maniar: Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences ‘17
        Monday, May 1, 2017

        Q: As a pre-pharmacy student, how have you prepared yourself for pharmacy school?

        A: Last year, I worked at Kroger Pharmacy on Hydraulic Road as a Pharmacy Technician. This is a retail environment and generally what people think when they hear the term “pharmacy.” Most of my time was spent filling orders for patients. There were also other tasks like restocking and keeping inventory as well as providing customer service for the counter and drive-through. Pharmacy involves a great deal of patient interaction. I currently volunteer at the Charlottesville Free Clinic where I am also a tech completing similar tasks but for an underserved population. I personally find volunteering more rewarding and the atmosphere is one that fits my personality better.
        Q: What training did you receive to be Pharmacy Technician?
        A: In order to be a Pharmacy Technician, you must be licensed. In order to be licensed, you would need to take an exam that includes information on technician responsibilities, state laws, and pharmaceutical names. If you work at a pharmacy, they will give you nine months from your employment date for you to get your license and most places will have modules or a teaching system that will equip you with the right information for you to pass your exam. Kroger will even reimburse you for your exam if you pass! At Kroger, I received hands-on preparation and learned by doing throughout my training period. I now volunteer at the Charlottesville Free Clinic and they have a special (free) program online where you can complete modules that will teach you everything you need to know for the state exam.
        Q: What should future students expect to encounter if they are looking for a retail pharmacy position.
        A: You should expect to always be on your feet and ready to go. Pharmacy settings from the outside might look really slow and boring but when you’re working, you’re always active. If you’re not helping patients with picking up their prescription at the counter or drive-through, you’re filling the other orders for the day so it’s crucial for you to be flexible with your work because sometimes you have to stop midway with an order to assist a patient who is checking-out.
        Q: How did you even get the Pharmacy Technician job in the first place?
        A: I went on to the Kroger website for new hires and made an account. Then I submitted my application and resume and received an email followed by a brief phone interview. After the interview, I completed a background check and education modules to learn about Kroger as a company and their policies, and then began to work in the pharmacy. I was very fortunate they were looking for new hires (they still are at Hydraulic!).
        Q: If I’m on the pre-pharmacy track, should I be a chemistry major or biology major? What major should I be?
        A: Honestly, it doesn’t matter – you can be an art major or even a linguistic major (like my big in the Pre-Pharmacy Society was!). As long as you fulfill the pre-requisites that the pharmacy school you want to apply have, then you’re set! Most pharmacy schools have the same pre-reqs, although the upper-tier schools often require a second semester of physics. Other unique classes outside of biology major includes Economics (micro or macro) and Public Speaking.
        Q: Do I have to finish all my prerequisites before I apply for pharmacy school?
        A: Ideally, you want to complete all your pre-requisites before applying to pharmacy school. Some schools will still consider you a viable applicant if you have one or two pre-requisites in process when you apply. If you are going to take pre-requisite coursework your fourth year, schools will work with you as long as your previous academic record was consistent. Some students will even take summer classes (mostly for classes unavailable at UVA such as public speaking), but the school must see that you have displayed a consistent academic record with the previous pre-requisites.
        Q: When do people usually apply for pharmacy schools? Is it normal to take bridge years?
        A: If you’ve prepared for pharmacy school since your first year, it’s realistic to apply the summer after your third year. For students who discovered pharmacy later in their undergraduate years, a bridge year is more likely. The application process begins in the summer (PharmCAS generally opens in July) and continues into the fall and spring. Most students take the PCAT (your entrance exam for pharmacy school) the summer you are applying. Everyone will have a different journey through the application process. Applying when you are realistically the strongest applicant possible is ideal!

        Q: Any last tips?
        A: Be diligent in your studies but don’t over-worry or stress. As long as you do your best and build good habits everything will fall into place on its own. Someone told me once that habits will follow you for the rest of your life and because it’s hard to break habits, it is very important to build good habits right now as an undergraduate.


        Rebekah Lee is a 3rd year pre-pharmacy student in the College majoring in Biology. She is the President of the Pre-Pharmacy Society and a member of the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board. Music and writing are two of her passions, and she works at the Music Building. Another hobby Rebekah has is tennis both playing and watching men’s tennis (no. 1 in the nation- wahoowa!). 

        Tuesday, April 25, 2017

        You are invited to visit the new APTA Financial Education Program, an online tool designed to increase financial literacy, including in the area of student debt. This free educational platform offers an individualized experience to users through videos, articles, webinars, quizzes, online communities, live chats, calculators, and more. Go to https://enrich.apta.org

        Monday, April 24, 2017
        On Wednesday, May 3 from 9:30-11:30am Julia Lapan and Anna Sullivan offering a design thinking workshop for students heading into the Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, and other service roles in which they have a big job to do in an unstructured environment with limited resources. The goal of the workshop is to help participants mentally prepare for their service experiences, reduce anxiety around the many unknowns of what they’ll be doing, and equip them to design their own toolkits that they can draw upon when feeling stuck or unsure in their new roles.
         
         

        Monday, April 24, 2017

        WHAT WILL VOLUNTEERS DO?
        Volunteers will assist the Charlottesville Free Clinic hospital staff, patients and their families in a wide variety of roles, as needed by CFC. This may include patient and nurse aid, administrative support and more. 

        WHERE?
        1138 Rose Hill Dr #200, Charlottesville, VA

        WHEN?
        At training, volunteers will be explained the method used by CFC to sign up for shifts throughout the week. There are a variety of shift options with the greatest need during evening clinics: Monday/Tuesday/Thursday 5 - 8pm. If that doesn't work for volunteers, there are a few daytime options for administration jobs or pharmacy handouts.

        To learn more and apply go to: http://www.madisonhouse.org/summer-programs/

        Monday, April 24, 2017

        FREE Science MCAT Lesson + $350 off Summer classes for attending!

        Thursday, April 20, 2017

        Virginia Eye Consultants 

        Upon entering college, I already had the goal of becoming an optometrist someday. I picked optometry because of my experiences with my own poor vision, which began in third grade when I was sent to the eye doctor because I couldn’t read the chalkboard from far away. When I was deciding what kind of career path I wanted to follow in college, I thought back to all the times my eye doctor explained the science behind my eyesight and how fascinating it was to me. Upon arriving at UVA, I didn’t think there would be many others who had this career goal, but I was pleased and surprised to find a Pre-Optometry Club table at the Fall Club Fair during my first semester. I quickly became involved with the Pre-Optometry Club in order learn from other students who were older than me and to find ways to get involved in order to enhance my application. The Pre-Optometry Club regularly hosts recruiters from different optometry schools who make presentations about what they are looking for in an applicant. From these presentations I’ve learned that a big part of what medical and health schools look for is experience and knowledge of the field, and today in this blog post I am going to talk about a summer work experience that contributed to both of these areas. 
        After my second year, I knew that summer I had to work to make money, but I didn’t think I could find a job that was health-related and one that I actually enjoyed. It was through a friend that I first heard about Virginia Eye Consultants—she had worked there the previous summer. I reached out to human resources inquiring about available positions, and after sending my resume and doing a phone interview, I was hired in the position of Client Support Specialist for the summer. When applying for a position like this, the process could vary depending on the company, but a good start is to contact someone human resources and see what they are looking for. If a friend puts in a good word for you, the process usually goes very smoothly. A lot of times it’s less stressful and intense than you think! 
        Virginia Eye Consultants is a large ophthalmology practice that sees and treats patients for all kinds of eye related issues, including surgery for glaucoma, cataracts, eye trauma, and LASIK vision correction. My position was on the clinical side where patients were seen before and after surgery and for check-ups. It was a large clinic and I guided the patients through each step of the process, set-up the rooms for the doctors, and even got to assist the doctors sometimes during their examinations. I learned so much about the health field that I didn’t know before because I was right there in the middle of all of the patient-doctor interactions. On a daily-basis, my roles really varied depending on who needed help that day. Sometimes my whole day would be accompanying patients to the different stages of their appointment, and other times it would be rotating between the different rooms and getting whatever the doctors needed during their examinations, like making phone calls to other clinics or running upstairs to the surgery clinic to check schedule availability if a patient needed an emergency surgery. Towards the end of my summer there, I even got to be trained on how to take different images of the eyes and was able to take pictures for doctors all on my own. The diversity of my role was a huge reason why I enjoyed this job so much—every day had different tasks and different patients and physicians to interact with. 
        I also learned how it takes the cooperation of many employees in different roles working together to give a patient the best experience. Not only was it a great learning experience, but also an invaluable networking opportunity. Through working there, I met over ten ophthalmologists and optometrists that I know I could contact if I ever wanted to shadow them. This was such a great experience and it just goes to show that there are so many opportunities out there, you just have to find them! UVA students with the same career interests are great resources for finding out about jobs, shadowing, or other ways to get involved in the field, so I definitely recommend finding a club that has students you can talk to about their experiences and get ideas for your own path. The Career Center also puts on a lot of programs with representatives from different companies that are really relaxed and fun, so I would check those out too to find out about different employment opportunities. The summer is a great time to use internships, jobs, or shadowing to enhance your application because schools will see how dedicated you are outside of the classroom.
        Kalie Leone is a 4thyear pre-optometry student in the College majoring in Biology. She is the President for the Pre-Optometry Club and has been a member of the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board for the last two years.
        Tuesday, April 18, 2017
        registration for SUNY's Spring Open House is now open at www.sunyopt.edu/openhouse. The event is scheduled for Thursday, June 1st, 2017 from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM.
        Students are welcome to bring up to 2 guests. Any questions regarding the event should be directed to our General Admissions email at admissions@sunyopt.edu
        To learn more about the SUNY Optometry program go to:  www.sunyopt.edu/explore
        Monday, April 17, 2017
        Fri, 4/21

        1-3 PM
        Newcomb Hall - South Meeting Room

        Get ready for the 2017 Black Student Research Network's Research Forum! The 2017 Research Forum will celebrate and present creative projects that deal with education, medicine, nursing, and science. During the Research Forum, undergraduate students can learn about research, meet with researchers, and plan for their future.

        Monday, April 17, 2017

        Liaison International, in collaboration with CareerEco, is hosting a Diversity Virtual Fair to answer your students’ questions about their next steps. During this free online event, admissions representatives from health profession schools across the U.S. will share information about the many programs and opportunities available. 

        Top reasons to participate:

        • Lower admissions costs by using our online solution to interact with top quality prospective students 
        • Interact in your own chat room with the option to conduct video sessions 
        • Unlimited access to all registered candidates’ information including exporting electronic resumes (Note: resume upload not required) 
        • Save time, travel, and staff required to participate in all day, on-site events 
        • Efficiently involve multiple participants (faculty, grad students, admissions, et. al.) in the admissions process 
        • Eliminate transportation and overhead costs associated with booth design and production

        Date: Tuesday, April 25th
        Time: 11 AM- 3PM 

        Click here to register for this FREE event!

        Monday, April 17, 2017
        James F. Londrey, DDS, located in Richmond, VA,  is offering a full-time, paid, internship position (s) for  1-2 prospective dental students in the application process  to work in our dental practice.  (We will also consider prospective dental hygiene students as well.)  
        This position offers the opportunity to work hands-on with our team, assisting Dr. Londrey with all dental procedures, learning practice management software, patient care, sterilization protocol, hygiene assisting and all aspects required to be a part of a busy established General Dentistry practice. These internship positions require full-time availability and a 10-12 month commitment beginning this summer.
        Our former assistants have found great success from their experiences working with us, and most are currently enrolled in dental school or graduated and practicing dentistry.  
        Below are the requirements and job description. If you know or would like to recommend a newly graduated student who may be interested in this opportunity, please ask them to contact Susan Brooks Londrey at londreydds@gmail.com



        Application Requirements:
        · Completed the DAT and all classes
        · Available to work Monday through Thursday; 7:15am-5:15pm; one year commitment (June 2017 – June 2018)
        · Applying to dental or dental hygiene school for 2018 class
        Job Duties:
        · Intern will learn all aspects of dental assisting, hygiene assisting, and practice management in a hands-on team environment
        Sunday, April 16, 2017

        Scribing at INOVA Fairfax Emergency Department

        Q: How did you become a scribe?
        A: Scribing is an opportunity that I would recommend to anyone considering a career in health sciences as it offers invaluable experience.  The first part of the process of being a scribe is to apply to a program, after which there is an interview, which is basically used by the head scribes to determine if they could see you being a valuable contributing member of the team. They also assess whether applicants are mature enough to handle working in an emergency department. Assuming that the interview goes well and the program has a spot available, you will be hired and the training portion begins. This involves approximately ten hours of technical training after which clinical training begins. The clinical part is eight full ten hours shifts where you shadow a senior scribe (someone who has been a scribe for over a year). Over the eight shifts, you slowly take on more responsibilities until the final shift where you do all the work, and the senior scribe merely observes.
                    I began scribing because I needed a job during summers and wanted experience in the medical field. I had heard of scribing through a family friend and the more I looked into it, the more I was interested. I was initially very nervous to begin scribing as I was only 18 and had just graduated from high school. I felt very young and unequipped to do the job, but I was lucky that the people training me were both knowledgeable and helpful. I learned so much from them over my eight training shifts, and after five years, I still remember lessons that they taught me. One of my favorite parts of working in the ER is that everyone is very willing to help, and that all you have to do is ask. I think that potentially the most important skill I have learned through my time of being a scribe is to admit when I do not know something and seek out the appropriate person to ask for help.
        Q: What is the role of a scribe?
        A: The primary job of a medical scribe is to accompany an ER doctor for the course of their shift and to complete the electronic medical record of each patient that you see. What this means is that you take down the history of the patients, record the physical exams that are done, and document any other important information on the patient, such as an important consult. These are the official duties of the scribe, but as you become more experienced, you are able to take on more responsibilities, such as prepping a room with the ultrasound machine and isolation gear or calling the pharmacist to help process an order. The only skill that is truly needed to be a scribe is the ability to type on a computer. Everything else just requires that you be able to adapt and be flexible.

        Q: What did you learn from your scribing experience?
        A: I find this job so valuable and rewarding because it gives you such an in depth view into what it is like to be a physician. You work the same hours and see everything that they do. This is a benefit, but it also means that the job requires a certain level of maturity and ability to handle difficult or stressful situations. I still vividly remember the first hour of my first training shift where three unstable trauma patients came in after a multi-car accident. I had never seen a real patient before and the first one I was introduced to was a middle-aged man with multiple lower leg fractures and a collapsed lung. These things are commonplace in the ER and take some getting used to, but it helps you quickly determine whether you want to choose a career where you could potentially see things like that every day.
                    I have taken so much away from this job. First of all, you acquire a wealth of medical knowledge, such as the tests to diagnose appendicitis. You learn a lot of the common language spoken amongst health care workers, such as what frequent flyer or road test mean. And what I think has been most important is that you learn how a complex team of doctors, nurses, techs, NPs, PAs, etc. is able to function in a cohesive manner to provide the best care to the patients.
        Q: Additional thoughts on being a scribe?
        A: It is a draining job at times; I can remember days where in the course of 45 minutes, I help welcome a healthy baby boy into the world and then walk into another room and witness a family tell the physician that they are finally ready to take their grandfather off of all treatments and let him die peacefully. There are patients that I still think about today and that have helped shaped the person that I have become. I would not trade these experiences for anything and would highly recommend this job to any pre-med student.

        Matthew is a 4thyear pre-med student in the College majoring in biology. He is the Weekly Service Chair for the American Medical Student Association (AMSA), a ULink Peer Advisor, and a member of the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board. During his bridge year, he will be scribing at Inova Fairfax Emergency Department, which he has done for the last four years during the summers.

        Thursday, April 13, 2017

        This busy dermatology practice has an immediate opening for a full-time medical assistant. This is an ideal opportunity for a pre-health student to broaden their knowledge of medicine and develop clinical skills prior to attending medical or PA school. As a medical assistant, you will have the opportunity to work directly with a physician or PA to help provide medical, surgical, and cosmetic dermatology services at one of three locations; Centreville, Sterling, or South Riding. An ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal skills, a good work ethic, and a highly organized, reliable, and proactive mindset. Duties include:

        • Taking patient history
        • Assisting the doctors with seeing patients
        • Scribing clinical notes on EMR and sending electronic prescriptions
        • Assisting with biopsies, surgeries, and other procedures
        • Handling communication with patients, insurance companies, and pharmacies (explaining pathology reports to patients, completing insurance pre-authorizations, modifying prescriptions, etc.)
        • Other duties as specified by management

        At least 1 year of experience in a healthcare setting and a 1 year commitment is preferred. To apply, please email your resume to the Office Manager, Anita, at aneely@dermdocs.com
         
        For more information, email Shreya at sg4cb@virginia.edu. She is a recent UVA graduate and a current DANV employee who will be starting medical school this summer. She would be happy to share her bridge year experience working at this wonderful dermatology practice with interested applicants.

        Tuesday, April 11, 2017
        Dr. Asima Bajwa is an ophthalmologist researcher looking for someone to work part time over the summer and into the school year. The assistant responsibilities are to help data entry and imaging upload for Aniridia clinical trial in Ophthalmology. If you are interested or know of anyone who is willing to spare 15 hours a week for $13/hour, please contact Dr. Asima Bajwa at AB5ZR@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu with interest or any questions.
        Monday, April 10, 2017

        Internships in the Medical, Dental and Health-Related Professions are still available through The University Internship Program (UIP). UIP internships combine academic instruction and work experience in an applied setting under the supervision and counseling of UIP faculty members, liaisons, and internship site supervisors/mentors. UIP interns earn four credits each semester. 

        We are recruiting for 2 Pharmacy Program Interns for the 2017 UVA 8 week summer session.   The interns will be active in many areas of a fully licensed pharmacy.

        We are also recruiting for a Clinical Research Intern.  The purpose of this internship is to introduce undergraduate students to the field of clinical research projects within the School of Medicine.  This is a 3 semester internship opportunity.  Interns will begin with an 8 week summer session which is an intensive learning and preparatory training time that will provide opportunities for many observational experiences (such as observing in the operating room, procedure areas, or clinic areas), weekly journal clubs for all UIP interns, and learning a broad overview of clinical research. This will continue into the 2017 fall semester, with the goal of the intern being able to have some independent projects that would continue into the 2018 spring semester. Interns will be assigned a primary mentor in one of the clinical research offices at UVA. 

        Additionally, we are looking for 3 Dental Interns for the 2017 UVA 8 week summer session.  The interns will take part in dental clinics, have the opportunity to observe resident and faculty dentists, provide chair-side assistance and administrative support and related duties.
        For additional information about the UIP, the internship opportunities listed above and other opportunities contact Ross Anderson 434-924-0697 (ra4dj@virginia.edu) or Madina Abusaleh 434-243-1751 (mia2be@virginia.edu), and visit UIP’s website and on-line internship listing: https://uip.coopercenter.org/
        Monday, April 10, 2017

        Physical Therapy Internship at Atlantic Sports & Rehabilitation


        How did you learn about your internship?
        As a second year, I applied to and was interviewed for a clinical internship through University Internships Program at UVa, through which I was placed at Atlantic Sports & Rehabilitation for the 2016-2017 academic year.
        What made you decide to engage in this clinical opportunity?
        Knowing that I desired to enter a health-related field, I sought out opportunities that would provide me with a way to gain skills such as bedside etiquette, in addition to the contact hours necessary to apply for graduate school. It also supplied me with 4 credits of upper-level Psychology per semester through a weekly seminar.
        What does your experience consist of?
        Most days begin with me reviewing the hourly patient schedule and recording any cancellations, after which I admit patients into treatment areas as they arrive to their appointment. My main task is assisting patients with completing their exercise regimens, however, I am also trained to apply therapeutic modalities to patients as well. In total, I work approximately 10-12 hours per week, split between two days.
        What has distinguished this opportunity from other options you might have pursued?
        The amount of clinical knowledge and hands-on experience I have obtained from my internship has been much greater than in any other healthcare setting I have had exposure to. Not only have I learned the physiological basis and scientific reasoning for use of various treatments, but I have also been taught how to use them on my own. In addition, I have been given the responsibility of handling patient files and recording new information, while maintaining confidentiality of their information-- tasks that are necessary in any healthcare profession.
        Why do you recommend this opportunity for other UVA students?
        I recommend a Physical Therapy internship to anyone seeking a greater amount of patient interaction and exposure to a healthcare setting. PT clinics provide a laid-back environment in which one can learn more about what the profession entails, while gaining confidence in their ability to provide effective care to individuals receiving therapy.
        How has this experience helped prepare you for the future?
        Interning at Atlantic has been principal in solidifying my decision to pursue a career in the medical field. Although I am still in the process of choosing between a DPT or DO program for graduate school, my internship has provided much insight into what I desire my future to look like in terms of work-life balance and workplace environment.
        Any advice?
        Overall, I highly suggest seeking opportunities that will serve as exposure to a type of career and the efforts, hours, and setting it entails, rather than simply as a means to gain hours or clinical skills. Knowing well in advance the quality of life you may have working in a certain profession is vital to knowing whether or not you should focus your education on preparing for that particular field. Make sure you enjoy it!
        Ashley Bykowski is a 3rd year pre-health student in the Curry School of Education majoring in Kinesiology. She has served on the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board since 2015.
        Friday, April 7, 2017
        Scribe Remotely
        If you’re thoroughly trained in a particular specialty, and have the discipline to make working remotely both practical and effective, Scribekick would like to explore possible work-from-home options with you.
        Scribekick works with doctors across the medical spectrum. Here are a few areas we currently serve and you can specialize in:
        • Primary Care: Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Pediatrics
        • Medical Specialties: Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Pulmonary, Radiation Oncology, PM&R/pain
        • Surgical/procedural specialties: Orthopedic, General, Breast, Urology, Dermatology
         Medical Scribe Requirements:
        • Full-time commitment: We prefer scribes who can commit to working full time with a particular doctor for one year. This lets you form a close working relationship and be of the greatest help to the practice. However, part-time opportunities are also available.
        • Punctual and responsible: The practice is going to rely on you for smooth operation, so you must have the utmost commitment to daily attendance.
        • Excellent communicator: Listening is key to being a successful scribe. You’ll also need to be able to quickly and efficiently communicate with your doctor, which entails a complete command of written and verbal English.
        • Superior multi-tasking and computer skills: These positions require almost constant work on a tablet or computer; the more accurate and speedy your typing and the better you’re able to juggle multiple tasks, the greater of an asset you’ll be to your doctor.
        • Keen attention to detail: Charting in an EMR is an exacting practice. You’ll need to be alert at all times and adept at catching even the most trivial of mistakes.
        • Significant interest in the field: You’re going to be immersed in the specialty of the practice. If you’re brimming with interest in the field and are thinking of pursuing it in future studies, this will benefit you as well as the doctor.
        Learn More and Apply! See what’s available now and submit an application by visiting: http://www.scribekick.com/become-a-scribe/
        Become a Traveling Medical Scribe Trainer 
        We’re a fast-growing company, but we made a commitment long ago to quality over quantity. We won’t start a scribe at a practice until we’re assured of a great fit that will make a positive impact on the operations of the practice as well as the life of the doctor. That’s where you come in.We’re constantly in need of experienced pros to show new scribes the ropes and help get practices up and running as smoothly as possible.
        If you love to travel and have a passion for improving the lives of doctors through scribing, we’re eager to work with you.
        As a traveling trainer, you’ll:
        • Earn significantly more than a typical scribe;
        • Delve into many different specialties throughout the medical field;
        • Create and implement cutting-edge strategies and techniques for efficient scribing;
        • Have your pick of different specialties, environments and locations;
        • Make an enormous positive impact as you introduce more doctors to the benefits of scribe support;
        • Earn miles and hotel stays for your travel with all travel reimbursed and stipends for meals;
        • And receive one plane ticket for a long weekend each month to a destination of your choice within the continental US!

        It’s a mission-critical job with a demanding schedule, but it brings vast rewards and could be a perfect fit for anyone with a passion for scribing and a love of travel. Learn more at: http://www.scribekick.com/become-a-scribe/

        Friday, April 7, 2017

        Join the PCOM community at our DO Open House on Friday, April 21st in Philadelphia!

        Registration and tours will begin at 4:00pm in Evans Hall.  Participants that evening will learn more about our admissions process, as well as the curriculum, osteopathic manipulative medicine and financial aid. Faculty and currently enrolled students will be available to provide additional insight into the academic experience on campus. Details regarding directions, parking and the campus map can be found at pcom.edu.

        Tours will be conducted and light refreshments will be served.For more information and to rsvp, please visit:
        http://www.pcom.edu/admissions/visit/visit-philadelphia/Doctor-of-Osteopathic-Medicine-Open-House-April-21-2017.html

        Thursday, April 6, 2017

        Work Directly with Doctors Across The Spectrum In Their Day-To-Day Practice

        Scribekick has a variety of full and part-time medical scribe jobs with doctors across a wide range of specialties in various locations throughout the mid-Atlantic and Southeast.
        What Is Scribing?
        As a medical scribe, you’ll chart each patient’s electronic medical record, allowing doctors to focus their attention strictly on the patient. This streamlines operations at the office and gives doctors more time to treat patients.
        Scribekick works with doctors across the medical spectrum. Here are a few areas we currently specialize in:
        • Primary Care: Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Pediatrics
        • Medical Specialties: Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Pulmonary, Radiation Oncology, PM&R/pain
        • Surgical/procedural specialties: Orthopedic, General, Breast, Urology, Dermatology

        Available Locations: We’re a growing medical scribe company with footprints throughout the Southeast and mid-Atlantic. Locations with current openings change frequently, so please check the website for current information.

        Medical Scribe Requirements

        • Full-time commitment: We prefer scribes who can commit to working full time with a particular doctor for one year. This lets you form a close working relationship and be of the greatest help to the practice. However, part-time opportunities are also available.
        • Punctual and responsible: The practice is going to rely on you for smooth operation, so you must have the utmost commitment to daily attendance.
        • Excellent communicator: Listening is key to being a successful scribe. You’ll also need to be able to quickly and efficiently communicate with your doctor, which entails a complete command of written and verbal English.
        • Superior multi-tasking and computer skills: These positions require almost constant work on a tablet or computer; the more accurate and speedy your typing and the better you’re able to juggle multiple tasks, the greater of an asset you’ll be to your doctor.
        • Keen attention to detail: Charting in an EMR is an exacting practice. You’ll need to be alert at all times and adept at catching even the most trivial of mistakes.
        • Significant interest in the field: You’re going to be immersed in the specialty of the practice. If you’re brimming with interest in the field and are thinking of pursuing it in future studies, this will benefit you as well as the doctor.

        Benefits

        • Unbeatable Experience: As you know, when it comes to deciding upon a future field of study, there’s no substitute for experience. During your work, you’ll essentially be shadowing one particular doctor day in, day out. This is an unparalleled opportunity for you to get a sense for what it’s really like providing care in your field. Plus, you’ll have a huge leg up on students who come into medical school without such practical experience.
        • In-Depth Training: Before you start, you’ll be put through an intense, fully-compensated training regimen to get you up to speed with scribing as well as the particular specialty of your practice.

        Learn more and see what’s available now and submit an application by visiting:

        Thursday, April 6, 2017
        In an ideal world, you’d be able to visit every PA school you are interested in. You would see the campus, chat with faculty, and get your questions answered. Well, we have the next best thing: virtual fairs. Not familiar with virtual fairs? They’re a way to connect with programs right from your computer or phone.
        You can visit each program’s “room” and have direct access to faculty and staff. Learn more about programs, get application tips, and find out about admission requirements. You’ll also have access to a CASPA representative so you can get details about the application process. The best part? It’s FREE!
        This year’s virtual fairs will be held on April 19–20 and July 18–19. You can register now for the April virtual fair.
        Have questions? Email us at events@careereco.com.

        Thursday, April 6, 2017
        VCU School of Dentistry Admissions Advising Appointments & Info Session

        Thursday, April 20th


        Meet with Dr. Susie Goolsby,
        an Admissions Office representative from the VCU School of Dentistry!


        Admissions Advising Appts
        UVA Career Center, Bryant Hall @ Scott Stadium; 9am - 4pm
        Dr. Goolsby is conducting 30 minute advising appointments to review prospective applicant candidacies for dental school. Meetings are intended for students NOT currently in the dental school application process, but who wish to apply in the future. Please plan to bring a copy of your transcript and resume. Business dress required for all individual appointments. Admissions advising appointments are limited. Register for an admissions appointment online.


        Info Session 
        Clark Hall, Room 101; 7-8pm 
        In collaboration with the Pre-Dental Society, Dr. Goolsby will provide an overview of the dental school application process with emphasis on VCU's admission requirements. Open to ALL students RSVP not required.

        Monday, April 3, 2017

        Becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

        What is a CNA? 
        The acronym CNA stands for certified nursing assistant. Essentially, it is a person who helps with a person’s daily activities of living, or ADLs (i.e. getting dressed/bathed, fixing meals, and even some lite housekeeping). You are CPR certified and knowledgeable in taking vital signs, along with some background information on specific diseases of the patients under your care. I like to think of the CNA as the front-line of medicine: you are the first to know when something seems wrong.

        How do I become a CNA?
        You must complete a CNA training program, which includes a course and clinical section. Some nursing homes actually offer training on the job, so that could be a plus! However, in order to officially practice, most employers require that you are state-certified, which requires you to pass a standardized test through the Virginia State Board of Nursing.

        For me, I completed my training program through the American Red Cross over the summer and became state-certified shortly thereafter. Overall, the process is really simple. Just make sure to not overthink anything and get nervous about your practicums, and you will be fine!

        What positions can I hold as a CNA?
        CNA positions, for the most part, are available in a variety of medical environments, including nursing homes, hospitals, and with home health agencies. For me, I had a unique experience where I was able to work not only as a home health aide but also as a CNA at a hospice house last summer. Both were very different experiences that gave me a better understanding of positions in the medical field.

        What made me decide to engage in this specific type of clinical experience as a pre-med?
        Most CNAs that I met chose to get clinical experience as a CNA because they wanted to explore the world of nursing. And as a CNA, you definitely get a lot of interaction with nurses because that is directly who you report to. On the flip side though, as a pre-med I also found this to be a plus. I wanted to be a CNA for two reasons: 1) to improve my bedside manner and 2) to understand another perspective. Being a CNA, you get to interact with a variety of medical personnel (the physical therapists, the attending physicians, the transport people, the nurses) and most importantly (or at least I think so) the families. These experiences I hoped would shape me into a better doctor; I thought I would get to see a more holistic view of medicine, and maybe learn how to incorporate that into how I would one day treat my patients.

        Choosing to work in home health and hospice care was driven by these factors. They gave me an opportunity to see and experience how patients and their families perceive care. I was able to live through the frustrations of insurance companies, through the back and forth hospital visits, through the late night emergencies, through the disagreement with doctors; it gave me an opportunity to see the medical community through their eyes.

        What is your most memorable experience?
        My first death. It seems morbid and unhappy, but it was at this point I knew going into medicine was the best decision for me. An elderly lady was in the process of dying, but had very few visitors. She seemed so lonely. She had dementia, and would change moods in a blink of eye. She used to tell me, “I hate you, no, I love you; I hate you, no, I love you” over and over again. One night, she was murmuring in her sleep, so I went and sat in her room to keep her company. Only a few minutes later did she pass away. Despite, the lack of pleasantries that come with death, she still seemed to have this peaceful look over her face. It was a sight really hard to grasp, yet somehow I felt peaceful knowing she wasn’t alone. Death isn’t easy, nor is it supposed to be, but this experience taught me how sincere compassion could ease the suffering that endured by others.

        How do I feel this experience has shaped me/prepared me for my path into the medical profession?
        Getting clinical experience as a CNA has given me a better understanding of the type of doctor I want to become. I want to show empathy, compassion, understanding, and most importantly respect (respect for my patients, for their families, and for the medical team I will work with). Yes, it is something to put on the resume, but overall it’s what you make of the experience. I loved working as a CNA, and it made me even more passionate about medicine and wanting to become a doctor.

        If I had one piece of advice to give, choose experiences that will give meaning to why you want to become a medical professional and not just something you need to check off a list. Especially, for pre-med students, sometimes it feels required: you need x amount of hours of this and you need these x, y, z activities, but ultimately it’s not the amount of activities, but rather, it’s the impact they have made on you that counts.

        Ashley Pandolf is a 4th year pre-med student in the College majoring in Biochemistry. She works in a medical research laboratory in UVA's Medical School assisting with cancer cell signaling knock-down research while also working part-time during school breaks with hospice and home health services as a CNA. She is the President of Women in Medical Initiatives and a member of the Pre-Health Student Leadership Advisory Board. 

        Monday, April 3, 2017
        Charlottesville Eye Associates is a busy Ophthalmology practice currently seeking full-time medical technicians. These are entry level opportunities with on-the-job training provided. They are seeking responsible and motivated individuals who desire to work in the healthcare field. Good communication and computer skills required. 
        Send resume to the the Charlottesville Eye Associates, Office Manager, Dawn Wright at imanager97@gmail.com 

        Monday, April 3, 2017

        Crozet Eye Care is seeking an Ophthalmic Technician (pre-test tech) to join their team. In this role, the ideal candidate will be working with patients on a daily basis, helping to make their experience at the office as pleasant and efficient as possible. They will be taking medical and pharmaceutical histories, and operating the latest in computerized diagnostic instrumentation to obtain preliminary vision prescription data (OCT, Optos, visual fields, etc.), intra-ocular pressures, color vision testing, and reading the prescription from current eyeglasses. Responsibilities also entail preparing the exam rooms for each patient's comprehensive eye exam and coordinating with our eye doctors and optical shop. They will also be responsible for ensuring the patient's medical data forms have been completed, guiding them through our office, and participating in other office duties as assigned.

        If interested, please contact the Office Manager, Michelle Layman at Michelle@CrozetEyecare.com.

        Monday, April 3, 2017

        Are you interested in learning more about the osteopathic medical profession and how to strengthen your medical school application? Join us for this special, in-depth look at the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) profession. Presentations will be provided by an osteopathic physician, medical school admissions deans, the director of AACOMAS, current medical students, and a premedical advisor!

        Topics and sessions will include:
        • Preparing and Strengthening Your AACOMAS Application
        • The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Osteopathic Medicine
        • Personal Statements and Letters of Recommendation: Recommendations for Improvement
        • Admissions Deans Panel: Insight from the Admissions Committee
        • DO Student Panel: Life as an Osteopathic Medical Student
        • Meet one-on-one with admissions representatives from approximately 20 DO schools from across the US
        • See an Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) demo and more!

        2017 FutureDOdoctor Recruitment Event
        Date: Wednesday, April 26
        Time: 5 - 9PM
        Location: Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel

        Pizza will be provided. Registration is required to attend this event and the deadline to register is April 23, 2017.

        Monday, April 3, 2017

        The University of Queensland School of Medicine Ochsner Clinical School is accepting applications for the 2018 entering class.To learn more about the program, please join an upcoming UQ Ochsner event:

        Webinar: UQ Ochsner Medical School Meet the Students
        Live with a MedEdPath Admissions Advisor and current UQ Ochsner students:
        Tuesday, April 4 at 7PM  
        RSVP

        New York City Information Sessions: Meet the Residents
        UQ Ochsner Medical School Graduates who begin Residency this summer will speak about their experiences in medical school and answer questions.
        Tuesday, April 25, 7PM - 8:30PM
        Adelphi University
        Manhattan Center, Second Floor, Room 263
        75 Varick Street
        Los Angeles, CA 900007
        RSVP

        2018 application information is available at http://www.mededpath.org/admissions.html
        For complete information about the UQ Ochsner program, upcoming events and admissions requirements, please visit www.mededpath.org or contact The UQ School of Medicine’s US representative at MedEdPath:

        Whitney Bennett, MA
        Vice President, Enrollment Management
        Cell: 646.476.0616
        wbennett@mededpath.org

        Thursday, March 30, 2017
        My name is Rachel, and I will be an incoming first year at UVA in the fall.  I have muscular dystrophy, and I require full time use of a wheelchair.  I would like to employ a group of female students on a rotational basis (to accommodate scheduling conflicts) to help take care of my basic activities of daily life, such as dressing, bedding, toileting, and showering.  I will need a total of about 8-10 hours per day of daily assistance.  The schedules can vary based on availability.
        The pay is about $12 an hour. I will handle the timesheets and payment will be from Virginia Medicaid.  No experience is necessary, but must be willing to learn, be reliable, and have a valid driver’s license.  My expectation is to have a minimum commitment of at least one semester, preferably at least two.
        If interested, please email rel2ua@virginia.edu or call/text 703-625-4362. Thank you!

        Monday, March 27, 2017
        Check out these classes you can take next fall to learn more about the world of health!
        ELA 2559: Liberal Arts and the Health Professions
        Instructor: Kim Sauerwein, Director of Pre-Health and Law Advising
        Liberal Arts and the Health Professions introduces 2nd and 3rd year UVA students to diverse health professions while engaging in a career exploration process. Students explore how insights from various disciplines inform their understanding of healthcare.  Guest lectures and informational interviews connect students with healthcare professionals to gain a better understanding of the various health professions and to assess their own career goals.  Students develop skills in interdisciplinary research and problem solving, in oral and written communication, and the integration of diverse perspectives.  
        GNUR5390: Introduction to the US Health System
        Instructor: Ben Mayes
        This course is designed to provide an overview of (1) how health care is financed, organized, and delivered in the U.S., as well as (2) the major policy challenges created by the system's organization, or lack thereof. In drawing from a variety of perspectives-including political science, economics and history-the course surveys the key stakeholders: those who pay for, provide and receive care.
        Friday, March 24, 2017

        Des Moines is excited to announce that it will be hosting program preview days throughout the summer months for students interested in physical therapy, physician assistant studies and podiatric medicine. A preview day gives students the opportunity to learn more about the profession, clinical opportunities, research, meet current students, and discover if DMU is a good fit for their professional and educational goals.

        Participants are given priority consideration in the application/admission process. The event does require a free online application, and applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. Fifteen participants will be selected for each event. Information regarding the events can be found below or by visiting our website at https://www.dmu.edu/admission/events/dmu-preview/

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